Activism & Social Media Podcast

The writer's headshot
Diego Peralta

 

Social media has shifted they way many things are planned, disseminated and executed including activism. In the following podcast I will be discussing my experiences with activism on social media. Feel free to leave comments with your thoughts.

 

The content of this podcast is based on personal real-life experience with social media activism and successful campaigns. I chose the topic of social activism on social media because I have had some experience with this. As mentioned, I have advocated for mental illness, I didn’t mention my volunteering for the Victorian Gay and Lesbian Rights Lobby in which I was in charge of their social media, keeping people up to date with any developments with the LGBTQI community locally and around the world. We also used social media to arrange very successful fundraisers – a comedy night where we rustled up some of Australia’s best comedians.

Along with my example of Thankyou, it appears that all my interactions with social media activism have been pleasant and they have been. Things could have easily gone wrong. Without the right approach my mental illness activism could have appeared to be shoving more ‘awareness’ down people’s throat, however I think by starting out sharing this personal side of me and telling my story with a network that knew me made a difference in creating a snowball effect.

Thankyou could have easily been overlooked in the same way. The sheer amount of products you can buy that supposedly donate a percentage for a charitable cause is overwhelming. So what makes Thankyou so different? I believe that engaging through social media, refraining from using shock or guilt to pull people towards their cause they instead informed and showed the people the issues they were wanting to tackle in a relatable way, aimed at young idealistic socially aware people. A recipe for success. The tract your impact facility also added to the organisation’s credibility.

As my podcast was based on my experiences there was not a lot of research that was required. The research I found the most valuable and relevant to this topic where  (Rotman, et al., 2012) states We know little about the benefits and possible costs of engaging in slactivism besides the fact it can be very powerful. The difference lies between outcome and engagement level. Also when (Paton, 2003) states, managing social enterprises, a societies response for new issues, social enterprises have made a societal difference highlighting that this is no exact science.

What I learned from the task is at the very least when it comes to social media activism inspiration, engagement, educating, recruiting the right people and action are key components.

When it came to editing and pulling the podcast together, I found Audacity needlessly complicated and Soundcloud wanted payment for royalty free music. Instead I used garageband, found a royalty free track on a particular website that offered these and then uploaded the finished product to Soundcloud and then embedded it into the blog post.

I was disappointed to see that I already had a software program – garageband that was a lot less complicated than Audacity and also to see that from what I could see Soundcloud didn’t offer actual royalty free music.

It appears there are a number of software programs and sites that offer what both Soundcloud, Audacity and Format Factory offer that can actually make this process a little easier and manageable.

 

 

References

BeyondBlue, 2019. BeyondBlue.[Online]
Available at: https://www.beyondblue.org.au/media/statistics
[Accessed 22 May 2019].

Paton, R., 2003. Managing and Measuring Social Enterprises. London: Sage publications.

Rotman, D. et al., 2012. From slacktivism: Participatry culture in the age of social media. Exteneded Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems , pp. 819-822.

Feature image: Garry Knight ‘Unite for Europe’ Flickr.com ( CC. 26.03.17)

Featured Audio Track: ‘Self driving] by So Freemusicarchive.org (CC. 20.05.19)

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